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according to the version approved by 
                           R & A Limited and the 
                   United States Golf Association 
30th Edition 
EFFECTIVE FROM 1 JANUARY 2004 
Copyright 2003 © 
              Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, 
                and the United States Golf Association 
                    All rights reserved 
                          R & A Rules Limited 
The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews has transferred to the R & A Rules Limited, efectodesde on 1 January 2004, the responsibilities and authority of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews to make, interpret and make decisions on the Rules Golf and the Rules delEstatuto amateur players. 

The new Rules of Golf and the new rules of amateur status are therefore approved by the R & A Rules Limited.Desde on 1 January 2004, the Rules of Golf and the Rules of Amateur Status must Player be made, altered, interpreted and applied by R & A Rules Limited. 

Gender in the Rules of Golf, the gender used in relation to any person is understood to include both genders. 
Disabled Golfer 
The R & A publication entitled "A Modification of the Rules of Golf for players Golfcon Disabilities", including amendments permitted by the Rules of Golf paraacomodar players with disabilities, can be obtained from R & A and the Royal 
Spanish Golf Federation. 

                   INTRODUCTION 
In the Year 2004 edition of the Rules of Golf 
With effect from 1 January 2004, government responsibilities and authority of the Royal 
and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews are being transferred to R & A Rules Limited. 
This book contains the Rules of Golf that are effective worldwide since January 1, de2004. It represents the culmination of four years of work performed by the Royal and AncientGolf Club of Saint Andrews and the United States Golf Association, after consultation with other 
golf organizations around the world. 
While the established numbering is maintained and any changes made mainly affects the way you play the game, this set of rules represents the complete revision of the Rules of Golf for the past twenty years. A review of the language 
Throughout the book has been carried out and for the first time, has been established a definite connection between the label in the game and the rules themselves. These and other substantial changes are summarized on pages ... ... ... .... 
By making all these changes, both government institutions have had in mind the constant need to clarify and simplify the Rules wherever possible. While these goals are not easily reconcilable, we believe a fair and reasonable balance has been 
conseguido.Ambos, the R & A and the USGA, they want to promote respect and adherence to the rules and preserve the 
integrity of the game at all levels. We pledge to continue our close union to achieve these ends for the good of the game of golf. 
Finally, we express our heartfelt thanks not only for work performed by our respective committees, but also to all those who in their many contributions in so many ways made possible this review. 
             Ian Pattison Paul D H R Caruso Jr. 
Chairman Chairman 
Rules of Golf Committee Rules of Golf Committee 
The Royal & Ancient United States 
Golf Club of St. Andrews Golf Association
      C O N T E N I D O 
INTRODUCTION 
HOW TO USE THE BOOK OF RULES 
MAJOR CHANGES 
SECTION I. Label 
II. Definitions 
III. The Rules of the Game 
GAME 1. The Game 
2. Match Play 
3. Stroke Play 
CLUBS AND 4. Los Palos 
BALL 5. The Ball 
RESPONSIBILITIES 6. The Player 
PLAYER 7. Practice 
8. Council; Indication of Line of Play 
9. Information about the coup that brought 
ORDER OF PLAY 10. Order of Play 
THE PLACE OF DEPARTURE 11. The Place of Departure 
PLAYING THE BALL 12. Searching for and Identifying Ball 
13. The ball is played as it lies 
14. Hitting the Ball 
15. Wrong Ball; Substituted Ball 
THE GREEN 16. The Green 
17. The Flag 
Ball Moved, 18. Ball at Rest Moved 
Bypass or 19. Ball in Motion Deflected or Stopped 
STOPPED 
SITUATIONS AND 20. Lifting, Dropping and Placing; 
Playing from Wrong Place PROCEDURES 
RELIEF 21. Cleaning Ball 
22. Or interfering Ball Assisting Play 
23. Loose Impediments 
24. Obstructions 
25. Abnormal Ground Conditions, 
Green Embedded Ball and Unfit 
26. Water Hazards (including 
Lateral Water Hazards) 
27. Ball Lost or Out of Bounds; 
Provisional Ball 
28. Ball Unplayable 
OTHER 29. Threesomes and Foursomes 
ARRANGEMENTS 30. Three-Ball, Best Ball (Best Ball) 
GAMING and Four-Ball (Four Ball) in Match Play 
31. Four-Ball (Four Ball) in Stroke Play 
32. Bogey, 
Par and Stableford 
ADMINISTRATION 33. The Committee 
34. Disputes and Decisions 
MAJOR CHANGES IN THE EDITION OF 2004 
                                   GENERAL 
All the rulebook has been rewritten for clarity, adopting a more 
modern. 
                                   LABEL 
Revised and expanded to provide more extensive guidance on the etiquette of the game and to clarify that a Committee may disqualify a player for a serious breach of etiquette 
under Rule 33-7 
                                 DEFINITIONS 
Ball in Play 
Expanded to clarify the status of a ball played from outside the teeing ground. 
Ball Lost 
Fixed part b to indicate that a ball is lost if the player has taken a blow to a substituted ball, and not to "have put another ball into play" just. 
Substituted Ball 
New Definition to clarify the difference between a and a Substituted Ball Wrong Ball. 
Bunker 
Amended to provide that the face of a sod-covered bunker is not part of the Bunker, is covered with grass or ground. 
Nearest Point of Relief Fixed for clarity. 
Rule or Rules 
Expanded to include Conditions of Competition and Decisions on the Rules of Golf. Tee (Support) 
New Definition to give specifications of a Tee (Support). 
                                    RULES 
Rule 2-5. Questions on how to proceed, Disputes and Claims 
Expanded to clarify the procedure to make a valid claim. 
Rule 3-3. Questions on How to Proceed 
Amended to provide that the player must inform the Committee in all cases, even when he believes he has had the same result with both balls. The penalty for not doing so is disqualification. 
Rule 5-3. Ball Unfit for Play 
Corrected so that the procedures for lifting the ball under Rule 5-3 and 12-2 are 
more consistent. 
Rule 6-4. Caddy 
Penalty for having more than a caddy corrected disqualification loss of hole in match play (adjustment of status of the party) or two strokes in stroke play, with a maximum of two holes in match play (Match Play) or four strokes in stroke play (Stroke Play). 
Rule 6-8d. Resumption of play procedure 
Note added to provide that if the point at which the ball must be placed is not determinable, when you resume the game must be estimated and the ball placed at that point 
(see exception for Rule 20-3c). 
Rule 7-1b. Practice Before or Between Rounds 
Expanded to clarify what constitutes testing the surface prior to a return. 
Rule 9-2. Information about the shots they hit, Match Play (Match Play) 
Separated into two categories - information about the beating and misinformation are being 
- And more explicit details about when a player is supposed to have given wrong information. 
Rules 10-1b and 10-2b. Order of Play 
Note introduced to clarify the order of play when a ball is not going to play as it lies 
(previously contained in Decisions 10 / 1, 10 / 2 and 10 / 3). 
Rule 11-1. Teeing (Arrange the Ball in Support (Tee))
Amended to clarify and introduce a penalty of disqualification for wearing a tee (medium) that does not meet established standards. 
Rule 12-2. Identifying Ball 
Corrected so that the procedures for lifting the ball under Rule 5-3 and 12-2 are more consistent. 
Rule 13-2. Improving the rest, the Area of Intended Stance or Swing, or 
                                 Line of Play 
                     Reformed for clarity. 
Rule 13-4b. Ball in Hazard; Prohibited Actions 
Amended to restrict penalty situations to touch the ground in the hazard or water in the water hazard with a hand or a stick. 
Exception 2 to Rule 13-4. Ball in Hazard; Prohibited Actions 
Corrected so that no longer allows the caddy smooth sand or soil in the hazard before the player made a hit. 
Rule 15. Substituted Ball, Wrong Ball 
Reformed and corrected for clarity. 
Rule 16-1a. Touching Line of Putt 
Amended to provide that the player may remove loose impediments on the green by any means, provided they do not press anything down. 
Rule 17. The Flag 
Fixed for clarity. 
Rule 18-6. Ball Moved in Measuring 
The Rule 10-4 has been removed and is introduced Rule 18-6, to provide that no penalty is incurred if a ball or a ball-marker moves to proceed under a Rule or to determine its application. 
Rule 20-3c. Placing and Replacing; unspecified points
Addition to set a player to resume play under Rule 6-8d puts the ball in the point estimate if the exact spot is not determinable. 
Rule 20-7. Playing from Wrong Place 
Fixed for clarity. 
Rule 22. Ball Assisting or Interfering with Play 
Fixed for clarity. 
Rule 23-1. Loose Impediments; Relief 
Rule 18-2c has been withdrawn and Rule 23-1 corrected to provide that a penalty for a player who makes his ball, which rests on any party other than the green, move due to remove a loose impediment will be considered under Rule 18-2a. Since there is no automatic penalty if a ball moves after touching a loose impediment located within one club-length of the ball. 
Rule 24-2b. Immovable Obstructions; Relief 
Corrected for clarity and to enable a player to take relief from an immovable obstruction in a bunker dropped out of the bunker, under penalty of one stroke. 
Rule 24-3. Ball Lost in Obstruction 
New rule created to deal with a lost ball in a movable obstruction and a ball lost in an immovable obstruction (previously covered by Rule 24-2c). 
Rule 25-1c. Lost Ball in Abnormal Ground Conditions 
Amended to clarify the reference point for relief when a ball is lost in an abnormal ground condition (correction made in the new Rule 
24-3b). 
Rule 25-3b. Wrong Putting Green; Relief 
Fixed for clarity. 
Rule 26-2a. Ball Played Within Water Hazard 
Revised and enlarged for clarity. 
Rule 28. Ball Unplayable 
Options b and c reversed to provide consistency with the construction of Rule 26-1. 
Rule 24-1a. Claims and Penalties; Match Play (Match Play) 
Fixed to ignore the points already covered by Rule 2-5. 
Rule 34-3. Committee Decisions 
Reference to "Secretary" corrected by "duly authorized representative of the Committee". 
                                 APPENDIX I 
Table of Contents for Appendix I 
Added to facilitate reference. 
Placement (Preferred Lies) 
Local Rule Example corrected for clarity and to establish that the position of the ball must be marked when lifted to elect the new resting place. The R & A now interpret this Local Rule. 
Nearby Immovable Obstructions Green 
Local Rule above for fixed sprinklers corrected to allow for the inclusion of any immovable obstruction located within two club-lengths of the green. 
                                  APPENDIX II 
Palo length 
1c clause amended to include a new limit of 121.9 mm (48 inches). 
Clubhead 
4b clause amended to include new restrictions on the dimensions and a maximum head size of 470 timber cc.9
                RULES OF GOLF 
SECTION I - ETIQUETTE; BEHAVIOR IN THE FIELD 
                                   Introduction 
This section provides guidelines on how the game should be played golf. Following these guidelines, all players will gain maximum enjoyment of the game. The primary principle (fundamental) is that in the field, should show respect for others in 
any time. 
                         The Spirit of the Game 
Unlike many sports, golf is played mostly without supervision of a referee or judge. The course is based on the integrity of the individual to show respect for other players and to abide by the Rules. All players deberíancomportarsedisciplinadamente, 
demonstrating courtesy and sportsmanship at all times, irrespective of how competitive they are. This is the spirit of the game of golf. 
                                 Security 
Players should ensure that no one is located near or in a position that can be beaten by the stick, ball or any stones, pebbles, twigs or the like when performing a stroke or practice swing. 
Players should not play until the players that precede them are out of reach. 
Players should also alert caregivers of the field, which are close or in front of them when they are about to play a shot that could damage them. 
If a player plays a ball in a direction where there is danger of hitting someone, you should immediately give a warning cry. The traditional word of warning in this situation is "ball" (Fore!). 
                 Consideration for Other Players 
                         No Disturbance or Distraction. 
Players should always show consideration for other players on the field and should not disturb their play by moving, talking or making unnecessary noise. 
Players should ensure that any electronic device brought into the field does not distract other players. 
In the place of departure a player should not put his ball until it is your turn to play. 
Players should not stand near or directly behind the ball, or directly behind the hole, when a player is about to play. 
                                  In the Green. 
On the green, players should not stand in the line of putt or another player when that player is executing a coup, to shade above the line of putt. 
Players should remain on or near the putting green until all other players in the group have holed out. 
                                   Annotation. 
In stroke play, a player who is acting marker should, if necessary, on the way to the next teeing check the score with the player that affects and record it. 
                               Pace of Play 
Play at Good Pace and Keep. 
Players should play at a good pace. The Committee may provide guidance on the pace of play that all players should follow. 
It is the responsibility of a group maintain its position with respect to the group that precedes it. If you lose an entire hole and is delaying the group that follows it, should invite the group to pass, regardless of the number of players in this group. 
10 
                     Be Ready to Play. 
Players should be ready to play as soon as his turn to play. 
When you are playing in or near the green, should leave their bags or carts in such a position that allowed rapid movement out of the green and toward the next tee. When you have finished the play of a hole, players should immediately leave the putting green. 
                             Ball Lost. 
If a player believes his ball may be lost outside a water hazard or is out of bounds to save time, should play a provisional ball. 
Players who are looking for a ball should signal to players in the group that still pass them as soon as they realize that the ball will not be found easily. It should not wait for the expiration of five minutes of searching. After allowing the group that still overtake them, should not continue play until the group has passed and are out of reach. 
                          Priority in the field. 
Unless the Committee otherwise determined by the priority in the field is determined by the tempo of a group. Any group that is playing a full turn is entitled to pass a group playing a shorter round. 
                           Care Field. 
                                    Bunkers. 
Before leaving a bunker, players should fix all the holes and smooth and 
steps they have done and any other close made by others. If there is reasonably close to the bunker rake should be used for that purpose. 
Chops Repair, Ball Marks and Damage by Shoes Acts. 
Players should carefully repair chops made by them and any damage done to the green from the impact of a ball (whether or not made by the same player). At the conclusion of the hole by all players in the group, the damage caused by the green 
golf shoes should be repaired. 
                  Preventing unnecessary damage. 
Players should avoid causing damage to the course by removing chops to make swings 
practice or by hitting the head of a club into the ground, either in anger or for any other reason. 
Players should ensure that no damage is done to support the green bags or use the flag. 
To avoid damaging the hole, players and caddies should not stand too close to the hole and should take care during the handling of the flagstick and the ball out of the hole. Head should not be used a stick to draw a ball from the hole. 
Players should not lean on their clubs when on the green, particularly when removing the ball from the hole. 
The flag should be properly replaced in the hole before the players leave the putting green. 
The local regulating the movement of golf carts should be strictly observed. 
Conclusion; Penalties for Violation. 
If players follow the guidelines in this section, make the game more enjoyable for everyone. 
If a player consistently disregards these guidelines during a round or over a period of time over others, it is recommended that the Committee consider taking appropriate disciplinary action against the offending player. Such action may, for example, include the 
prohibition for a limited time to play on the field or in a number of competitions. This is considered justified as a means of protecting the interests of the majority of golfers who want to play according to these guidelines. 
In the case of a serious breach of etiquette, the Committee may disqualify a player under Rule 33-7. 
11 
SECTION II - DEFINITIONS 
Definitions are arranged alphabetically and in the Laws themselves are defined terms in italics (italics). 
                                 Accidental Water 
"Water accidental" is any temporary accumulation of water on the field that is visible before or after the player takes his stance, and not in a water hazard. Snow and ice 
natural, other than frost, are casual water or loose impediments, at the option of the player. 
Manufactured ice is an obstruction. Dew and frost are not casual water. A ball is in casual water when it lies in or any part of it touches the casual water. 
                                        Hole 
The "hole" will be 108 mm in diameter (4 ¼ inches) and at least 101.6 mm (4 inches) 
deep. If using a liner, is sunk at least 25.4 mm (1 inch) per 
below the green surface unless the nature of the soil make this impracticable, its external diameter not exceeding 108 mm (4 ¼ inches). 
                           Burrowing Animal 
A "burrowing animal" is an animal that makes a hole for habitation or shelter, like a rabbit, mole, a marmot, a ground squirrel or a salamander. 
Note: A hole made by an animal other than a burrow like a dog, not an abnormal ground condition, unless marked or declared as ground under repair. 
                                        Referee 
A "referee" is the person designated by the Committee to accompany players to decide 
questions of fact and apply the Rules. Will react to any breach of a Rule that you can see or that can be communicated. 
A referee should not attend the flagstick, or remain near the hole or mark the position of the hole, or lift the ball or mark its position. 
                                       Flag 
The "flag" is a right and movable indicator, which can be incorporated cloth or other material, placed in the center of the hole to indicate its position. It will be circular in cross section. 
The prohibited materials or absorbent cushioning blows that might unduly influence the movement of the ball. 
                                       Bando 
A "side" is a player, or two or more players who are partners. 
Best-Ball 
See "Matches." 
                                 Ball Holed 
A ball is "holed" when it lies within the circumference of the hole and all of it is below the edge of the hole. 
                                Ball in Play 
A ball is "in play" as soon as the player has made a stroke on the teeing ground. 
Continued "in play" until holed out, except when it is lost, out of bounds or lifted, or has been replaced by another ball, whether or not permitted substitution of a ball and replaces the previous one becomes the "ball in game ". 
If a ball is played from outside the teeing ground when the player is starting to play a hole, or when you are trying to correct this error, the ball is in play and applied Rule 
11.4 or 11.5. Otherwise, ball in play includes a ball played from outside the teeing ground when the player chooses or is required to play his next stroke from the teeing ground. 
Exception Match play: Ball in play includes a ball played by the player from outside the teeing ground when starting play of a hole if the opponent has not required that the stroke is canceled in accordance with Rule 11-4a. 
                                 Wrong Ball 
A "wrong ball" is any ball other than: 
- The player's ball in play; 
- Provisional ball player, or 
- In stroke play a second ball played by the player under Rule 3-3 or Rule 20-7c, 12 
and includes: 
- The ball of another player; 
- An abandoned ball and 
- The player's original ball when not in play 
Note: Ball in play includes a ball that has replaced the ball in play, whether or not such substitution is permitted. 
                              Ball Holed 
See "Holed." 
                               Ball Lost 
A ball is considered "lost" if: 
a. It is not found or identified as his by the player within five minutes counted from the side of the player or his or their caddies have begun a search, or 
b. The player has made a stroke at a substituted ball, or 
c. The player has made a stroke at a provisional ball from the spot where the ball is supposed to be original or from a point nearer the hole than that place. 
The time spent in playing a wrong ball do not account for the period of five minutes allowed for your search. 
                   Ball allegedly Movida 
It is considered that a ball "moved" if you leave your position and goes to rest in any other 
place. 
                           Provisional Ball 
A "provisional ball" is a ball played under Rule 27-2 when a ball may be lost outside a water hazard or may be out of bounds. 
                            Substituted Ball 
A "substituted ball" is a ball put into play instead of the original ball was either in play, lost out of bounds or lifted. 
                                 Bunker 
A bunker is an obstacle consisting of a prepared area of ground, often a depression, in which the turf or soil has been removed and replaced with sand or similar. 
The grass-covered ground bordering or within a bunker, including the walls formed with "turf" (or grass covered land) is not part of the bunker. A wall or lip of a bunker not covered with grass, are part of the bunker. 
The margin of a bunker extends vertically downwards but not upwards. A ball is in a bunker when it lies in or any part of it touches the bunker. 
                                  Caddy 
A caddy is someone who helps the player under the Rules, which may include carrying or handling the player's clubs during play. 
When a caddy is used by more than one player is considered whenever the caddy of the player whose ball is involved, and the equipment carried is considered to be the team that player, except when the caddy is acting under specific orders in which case another player is considered the caddy of the other player. 
                                  Field 
The "field" is the whole area within any limits set by the Committee (see Rule 33-2). 
                                 Outside agency 
An "outside agency" is one that is not part of the match or stroke play is not part of the competitor's side, and includes a referee, a marker, an observer and a forecaddie. Neither wind nor water are outside agency. 
                             Register (Stance) 
"Stand" is that a player puts his feet in position to prepare for a coup. 
                                  Committee 
The "committee" is the competition committee or, if the question does not arise in a competition, the committee responsible for the field. 
13 
                                 Roommate 
A "companion" is a player associated with another player on the same side. 
In a game threesome, foursome, best-ball (best ball) or four-ball (four ball), where the context so admits, the term "player" includes his partner or partners. 
                        Fellow-Competitor 
See "Competitor." 
Competitor 
A "competitor" is a player in a stroke competition. A "fellow-competitor" is any person with whom the competitor plays. Neither is partner of the other. 
In the stroke play foursome and four-ball competitions (four ball), where the context so admits, the word "competitor" or "fellow-competitor" includes his partner. 
                  Abnormal Ground Conditions 
An "abnormal ground condition is any casual water, ground under repair or hole, waste or path in the field made by a burrowing animal, a reptile or a bird. 
                                    Council 
"Council" is any opinion or suggestion that could influence a player in determining his play, the choice of club or the method for making a stroke. 
Information regarding the Rules or on matters of public domain, such as the position of obstacles or the flagstick on the green is not advice. 
                         Four-Ball (Four-Ball) 
                                 See "Matches." 
              Team 
"Equipment" is anything used, placed or carried by or for the player except any ball that he played in the hole being played and any small object such as a coin or a ball holder (tee), when used to mark the position of a ball or the extent of the area in which a ball must be dropped. Equipment includes a golf cart, motorized or not. If the car is shared by two or more players, car and everything is in it is considered team player whose ball is involved, except that when the car is being driven by one of the players who share the car and everything in it is considered that player's team. 
Note: A ball played into the hole being played is equipment when it is lifted and not put back into play. 
                         Eventuality of the Game 
A "game event" occurs when a ball in motion is accidentally deflected or stopped by an outside agency (see Rule 19-1). 
                                Forecaddie 
A "forecaddie is someone hired by the Committee to indicate to players the position of balls during the game. He is an outside agency. Foursome 
See "Matches." 
                              Out of Bounds 
"Out of limits" is the terrain that is beyond the limits of the field or anywhere on the field marked as such by the Committee. 
When out of bounds is defined by stakes or a fence, or located beyond stakes or a fence, the out of bounds line is determined by the closest points to the field of the stakes or fence posts at soil, excluding angled supports. 
Objects defining out of bounds such as walls, fences, stakes and fences are not obstructions and are considered fixed. 
When out of bounds is marked by a line on the ground, the line itself is out of bounds. 
The line that defines the outside boundary extends vertically upwards and downwards. 
A ball is out of bounds when all of it lies out of bounds. 
A player may stand out of bounds to play a ball that is within limits. 
14 
                                     Stroke 
A "coup" is the movement of the stick towards the ball with the intention to strike and move, but if a player stops the descent of the club voluntarily before the clubhead reaches the ball he has not made a stroke. 
                            Penalty stroke 
A "penalty stroke" is that under the application of the Rules is added to the result of a player or side. In the threesome or foursome, penalty strokes do not affect the order FLOW. 
                                           Green 
The "green" is all the land of the hole being played, prepared especially for the putt, 
or otherwise defined as such by the Committee. A ball is on the putting green when any 
part of it touches the green. 
Wrong Putting Green 
A "wrong putting green" is any putting green other than the hole being played. Unless the Committee as otherwise stated, this term includes a practice green or green to practice putts (chips) in the field. 
                                        Honor 
It says it has the "honor" the player has to play first from the teeing ground. 
                         Loose Impediments 
"Loose impediments" are natural objects including: 
- Stones, leaves, twigs, branches and the like, 
- Excrement, 
- Worms and insects, and waste or piles formed by them, 
provided they are: 
- Fixed or growing, 
- Solidly built, 
- Adhering to the ball. 
Sand and loose soil are loose impediments on the putting green but not elsewhere. 
Snow and natural ice, other than frost, are casual water or loose impediments player choice. 
Dew and frost are not loose impediments. 
Single (Single) 
See "Matches" games. 
                                  Line of Play 
The line of play 'is the direction the player wishes his ball to take after a stroke, 
plus a reasonable distance on either side of the desired direction. The line of play extends vertically upwards from the ground, but does not extend beyond the hole. 
                                Line of Putt 
The line of putt "is the line that the player wishes his ball to take after a stroke on the green. Except with respect to Rule 16-1e, the line of putt includes a reasonable distance on either side of the desired line. The line of putt does not extend beyond the hole. 
                                 Teeing 
The "teeing ground" is the place from which to start the game in the hole to play. It is a rectangular area with a depth of two sticks and whose front and sides are defined by the outer two marks. A ball is outside the teeing ground when all of it lies outside
this area. 
                                  Scoreboard 
A "marker" is the person designated by the Committee to record the result of a competitor in stroke play. May be a fellow-competitor. It is not an arbitrator. 
                                 Observer 
An "observer" is the person designated by the Committee to assist the referee to decide questions of fact and report any breach of a Rule. An observer should not attend the flagstick, stand by the hole or mark the position of the hole, or lift the ball or mark its position. 
15 
                                Barriers 
A "barrier" is any bunker or water hazard. 
Water Hazard 
A "water hazard" is any sea, lake, pond, river, ditch, surface drainage or other open water (containing water or not) and anything else of similar nature in the field. 
All ground or water within the margin of a water hazard is part of the water hazard. 
The margins of a water hazard extends vertically upwards and downwards. Stakes and lines defining the margins of a water hazard are in the hazard. 
Such stakes are obstructions. A ball is in a water hazard when it lies in or any part of it touches the water hazard. 
Note 1: Stakes or lines used to define a water hazard must be yellow. When both stakes and lines are used to define water hazards, the stakes identify the obstacle and the lines define the margin of the hazard. 
Note 2: The Committee may make a Local Rule prohibiting play from an environmentally sensitive area which has been defined as a water hazard. 
Lateral Water Hazard 
A "lateral water hazard is a water hazard or that part of a water hazard, 
located so that it is not possible or deemed impractical Committee drop a ball behind the water hazard in accordance with Rule 26-1b. 
The part of a water hazard to be played as lateral water hazard should be differentiated brands. A ball is in a lateral water hazard when it lies in or any part of it touches the lateral water hazard. 
Note 1: Stakes or lines used to define a lateral water hazard must be red. 
When both stakes and lines are used to define lateral water hazards, the stakes identify the obstacle and the lines define the margin of the hazard. 
Note 2: The Committee may make a Local Rule prohibiting play from an environmentally sensitive area which has been defined as a lateral water hazard. 
Note 3: The Committee may define a lateral water hazard as a water hazard. 
                               Obstructions 
A "barrier" is any bunker or water hazard. 
Water Hazard 
A "water hazard" is any sea, lake, pond, river, ditch, surface drainage or other open water (containing water or not) and anything else of similar nature in the field. 
All ground or water within the margin of a water hazard is part of the water hazard. 
The margins of a water hazard extends vertically upwards and downwards. Stakes and lines defining the margins of a water hazard are in the hazard. 
Such stakes are obstructions. A ball is in a water hazard when it lies in or any part of it touches the water hazard. 
Note 1: Stakes or lines used to define a water hazard must be yellow. When both stakes and lines are used to define water hazards, the stakes identify the obstacle and the lines define the margin of the hazard. 
Note 2: The Committee may make a Local Rule prohibiting play from an environmentally sensitive area which has been defined as a water hazard. 
Lateral Water Hazard 
A "lateral water hazard is a water hazard or that part of a water hazard, 
located so that it is not possible or deemed impractical Committee drop a ball behind the water hazard in accordance with Rule 26-1b. 
The part of a water hazard to be played as lateral water hazard should be differentiated brands. A ball is in a lateral water hazard when it lies in or any part of it touches the lateral water hazard. 
Note 1: Stakes or lines used to define a lateral water hazard must be red. 
When both stakes and lines are used to define lateral water hazards, the stakes identify the obstacle and the lines define the margin of the hazard. 
Note 2: The Committee may make a Local Rule prohibiting play from an environmentally sensitive area which has been defined as a lateral water hazard. 
Note 3: The Committee may define a lateral water hazard as a water hazard. 
                               Obstructions 
An "obstruction" is anything artificial, including the artificial surfaces and edges of roads and paths and manufactured ice, except: 
a) Objects defining out of bounds such as walls, fences, stakes and railings; 
b) Any part of an immovable artificial object which is out of bounds, and 
c) Any construction declared by the Committee as part of the field. 
An obstruction is a movable obstruction if it can be moved without unreasonable effort, without unduly delaying play and without causing any damage. Otherwise, it is an immovable obstruction. 
Note: The Committee may make a Local Rule declaring a movable obstruction as 
immovable obstruction. 
                                  Games 
Single: A match in which a player plays against another. 
Threesome: A match in which one plays against two and each side plays one ball. 
Foursome: A match in which two play against two and each side plays one ball. 
Three-Ball (three-ball): A competition by holes in which three play each against each other and each plays his own ball. Each player is playing two distinct matches. 
Best-Ball (Best Ball): A match in which one plays against the better ball of two or the best ball of three players. 
Four-Ball (four-ball): A match in which two play their better ball against the better ball of two other players. 
                               Prepare the Coup 
A player has "prepared the blow when well placed and has supported the club on the ground, except in a hazard in which case the player has prepared the blow with only register. 
                      Nearest Point of Relief 
The "nearest point of relief" is the benchmark for relief without penalty from interference by an immovable obstruction (Rule 24-2), an abnormal ground condition 
(Rule 25-1) or a wrong putting green (Rule 25-3). 
It is the point in the course nearest to where the ball lies: 
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(i) that is not nearer the hole, and 
(ii) where, if the ball was well situated, there would be no interference by the condition of relief that the player wants to hit the player could have run from the original position if the condition were not there. 
Note: In order to accurately determine the nearest point of relief, the player should use the stick with which would have carried his next stroke if the condition were not there, to simulate the position of preparing the coup, the direction of play and swing for the coup. 
R & A 
The "R & A" means R & A Rules Limited. 
Tour 
"Timeline" is the whole field area, except: 
a. The teeing ground and putting green of the hole being played, and 
b. All obstructions to the field. 
Rule or Rules 
The term "Rule" includes: 
a. The Rules of Golf and their interpretations contained in Decisions on the Rules of Golf; 
b. Any Condition of Competition established by the Committee under Rule 33-1 and 
Appendix I; 
c. Any Local Rule established by the Committee under Rule 33-8a and Appendix I, and 
d. The specifications on clubs and the ball in Appendices II and III. 
Tee (Support) 
A tee is a device designed to lift the ball on the ground. There should be no longer than 101.6 mm (4 inches) and should not be designed or manufactured in such a way as to indicate the line of play or influence the movement of the ball. 
                       Ground Under Repair 
"Land under repair any part of the field is marked as such by order of the Committee or so declared by its authorized representative. It includes material piled for removal and any hole made by a caretaker of the field, even if not marked as such. 
All ground and any grass, bush, tree or other growing thing within the ground under repair is part of the ground under repair. The margin of ground under repair extends vertically downwards but not upwards. Stakes and lines defining ground under repair are in that land. These stakes are obstructions. A ball is in ground under repair when it lies in or any part of it touches the ground under repair. 
Note 1: Grass clippings and other materials left in the field who have been abandoned, and not intending to withdraw, they are not ground under repair unless they are marked as such. 
Note 2: The Committee may make a Local Rule prohibiting play from ground under repair or from an environmentally sensitive area which has been defined as ground under repair. 
                                    Threesome 
See "Matches" games. 
Three-Ball (Three-Ball) 
See "Matches" games. 
Stipulated Round 
The "stipulated round" consists of playing the holes of the course in their correct sequence unless 
the Committee authorizes do otherwise. The number of holes of a stipulated round is 18, 
except that the Committee authorize a smaller number. Regarding the extension of the stipulated round 
in match play, see Rule 2-3. 
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SECTION III - RULES OF THE GAME 
GAME 
Rule 1. The Game 
Definitions All defined terms are written in italics (italics) and are listed alphabetically in the Definitions section. See page ... 
1-1. General 
The Game of Golf consists of playing a ball with a club from the teeing ground into the hole by a stroke or successive strokes in accordance with the Rules. 
1-2. Exerting Influence on Ball 
A player or caddy should do nothing to influence the position or movement of a ball except when the rules allow. 
(Removing movable obstructions - see Rule 24-1.) 
Penalty for breach of Rule 1-2 
Match play - Loss of hole; 
Stroke play - Two strokes 
Note: In case of a serious breach of Rule 1-2, the Committee may impose a penalty of disqualification. 
1-3. Agreement to Waive Rules 
The players will agree to exclude the operation of a Rule or delete any penalty incurred. 
PENALTY FOR BREACH OF RULE 1-3: 
Match play - Disqualification of both sides; 
Stroke play - Disqualification of competitors concerned. 
(Agreeing to play out of turn in the game hits - see Rule 10-2c). 
1-4. Points Not Covered by Rules 
If any point in dispute is not covered by the Rules, the decision should be made according to the principles of equity. 
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Rule 2. Match Play (MATCH PLAY) 
Definitions All defined terms are written in italics (italics) and are listed alphabetically in the Definitions section. See page ... 
2-1. General. 
A match consists of one side plays against another a stipulated round, unless the otherwise agreed comitélo. In "Match Play is played by holes. 
Except as otherwise provided in the Rules, a hole is won by the side that 
before building his ball in the fewest strokes. In a handicap match wins the hole with the 
lower net income. 
The situation of the match is expressed in the following terms: so many "holes up" or 
"tied" and many "play." 
One side is "asleep" when he brings up as many holes are holes to play. 
2-2. Tied hole. 
A hole is tied if each side has finished the hole with the same number of strokes. 
When a player has holed out and his hand he is a blow to the draw, if the player 
incurs a penalty later in the hole is tied. 
2-3. Winner of Match. 
A match is won by the side that leads to another in a number of holes greater than the 
number of holes remaining to play. 
If there is a tie, the Committee may extend the stipulated round as many holes as are 
necessary for a party has a winner. 
2-4. Concession of Next Stroke, Hole or Match. 
A player may concede his opponent his next stroke at any time, provided that the 
opponent's ball is at rest. Is considered to have holed out with his hand following 
stroke and the ball can be removed by either side. 
A player may concede a hole at any time prior to the start or completion 
the hole. 
A player may concede a game at any time prior to the initiation or 
completion of the match. 
The grant can not be withheld or withdrawn. 
(Ball hanging from the hole - see Rule 16-2) 
2-5. Questions of Procedure, Disputes and Claims. 
In match play (match play), if a doubt or dispute arises between players, a player 
can make a claim. If an authorized representative of the Committee is not available within 
a reasonable time, players continue the match without delay. The Committee may 
consider a claim only if the player making the same notifies his opponent (i) 
which is making a claim, (ii) the facts of the situation and (iii) who wants a 
decision. The claim must be made before any player in the match play 
from the next teeing ground or, in the case of the last hole of the match, before all 
players in the match leave the putting green. 
A subsequent appeal should not be considered by the Committee, unless that is based on 
facts previously unknown to the player making the claim and has been given 
wrong information (Rules 6-2a and 9) by an opponent. 
Once the match result has been officially announced, a claim no later 
will be considered by the Committee, unless he is satisfied that the opponent knew he had 
given wrong information. 
2-6. General Penalty. 
In match play (match play) the penalty for violating a rule is loss of hole at 
unless it is otherwise provided. 
19 
Rule 3. Stroke play (STROKE PLAY) 
Definitions All defined terms are written in italics (italics) are 
sorted alphabetically in the Definitions section. See page ... 
3-1. Winner 
The competitor who plays the stipulated round or rounds in the fewest strokes is the 
winner. 
In a handicap competition, the competitor with the lowest net result on lap or laps 
set is the winner. 
3-2. Hole Without End 
If a competitor leaves of pocketing the ball on any hole and does not correct his mistake before playing 
following a stroke on the teeing ground or, in the case of being the last hole of the round before 
he leaves the green, he is disqualified. 
3-3. Doubts about the procedure. 
a. Procedure 
In stroke play, if a competitor doubt about their rights or about the procedure 
right during the play of a hole can, without penalty, complete the hole with two balls. 
After the doubtful situation has arisen and before taking further action, the competitor must 
announce to his marker or a fellow-competitor that intends to play two balls and 
which ball you want to count if the Rules permit. If it does so, it applies the provisions of 
Rule 3-3b (ii). 
The competitor must report the facts of the situation to the Committee before returning his card 
results. If it does so, he is disqualified. 
b. Determining the outcome of a hole 
(i) If the ball that the competitor selected in advance to count has been played 
accordance with the Rules, the result with that ball is the result of a competitor in the hole. Of 
Otherwise, consider the outcome of the other ball if the Rules allow the procedure adopted 
for that ball. 
(ii) If the competitor does not announce in advance its decision to terminate the hole with two balls, or what 
ball want to count, will result with the original ball, always has been played 
accordance with the Rules. If the original ball is one ball moves, has the ball put 
in the first game ever it has been played under the Rules. Otherwise, 
account the result with the other ball if the Rules allow the procedure adopted for this 
ball. 
Note 1: If a competitor plays a second ball under Rule 3-3, the blows made with the 
ball after it has not been invoked this rule and penalty strokes 
incurred solely by playing that ball, not taken into account. 
Note 2: A second ball played under Rule 3-3 is not a provisional ball under Rule 27-2. 
3-4. Refusal to comply with a Rule 
If a competitor refuses to comply with a Rule affecting the rights of another competitor, is 
disqualified. 
3-5. General Penalty 
The penalty for breach of a Rule in stroke play is two strokes except when 
is arranged differently.

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